Human rights due diligence policy

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The human rights due diligence policy on United Nations support to non-United Nations security forces (HRDDP) is a Secretariat policy document, issued in October 2011, to ensure that all United Nations support to non-United Nations forces is consistent with the purposes and principles of the Charter and with its responsibility to respect, promote and encourage respect for international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law.

The text of the policy was communicated to Member States in a letter dated 25 February 2013 from the Secretary-General A/67/775—S/2013/110.

Scope

HRDDP applies to all United Nations entities providing support to non-United Nations security forces, including peacekeeping operations, special political missions and agencies, funds and programmes.

Support within the scope of this policy includes:

  • Training, mentoring, advisory services, capacity- and institution-building and other forms of technical cooperation for the purpose of enhancing the operational capabilities of non-United Nations security forces;
  • Ad hoc or programmatic support to civilian or military authorities directly responsible for the management, administration or command and control of non-United Nations security forces;
  • Financial support, including payment of salaries, bursaries, allowances and expenses, whatever the source of the funds;
  • Strategic or tactical logistical support to operations in the field conducted by non-United Nations security forces;
  • Operational support to action in the field conducted by non-United Nations security forces, including fire support, strategic or tactical planning; and
  • Joint operations conducted by United Nations forces and non-United Nations security forces.

Activities outside of the scope of this policy include:

  • Training or sensitization regarding international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law;
  • Standard-setting (e.g. advice on and review of legislation, codes and policies) and capacity support directly related to the implementation and promotion of compliance with human rights laws and standards and to foster democratic governance of security institutions;
  • Engagement to promote compliance with humanitarian, human rights and refugee law or to negotiate humanitarian access and carry out relief operations;
  • Mediation and mediation-related support;
  • Medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) and casualty evacuation (CASEVAC).

Phases of implementation

At the outset, each United Nations entity is required to establish a procedure for intervention, implementation framework or standard operating procedure and an HRDDP monitoring mechanisms. At the United Nations country team level, HRDDP monitoring capacity for the United Nations system in-country should be identified. In addition, it is recommended that the UNCT conduct a mapping of existing/planned support to non-United Nations security forces in country and to conduct a general and preliminary risk assessment of all national security forces. [1]

HRDDP implementation consists of four phases:

  1. Communication of the policy to national authorities and other external partners
  2. Risk assessment and, if relevant, mitigating measures
    This is to be done before support is provided, and should take into account the human rights record of the intended recipients, accountability record, prevention mechanisms in place, national legislation or policy (e.g. shoot to kill policies) that may increase risk, feasibility of monitoring framework, the ability of the United Nations to influence and the risk of not providing support, risks inherent to the operation and risks inherent to the type of support envisaged.
  3. Monitoring
  4. Intervention when grave violations are committed

See also

References

  1. Guidance note on HRDDP (October 2015)